Current research topics in AES (The Atmosphere in the Earth System, MPI-M)

For further information and questions concerning the position, please contact Bjorn Stevens.

Such atmosphere’s can be thought of as a prelude to the Venusian atmosphere, a future state of Earth’s atmosphere under extreme warming, or characteristic of exoplanets. Depending on the candidate's background either the radiative transfer, the fluid dynamics, or (and ideally) both, of such atmospheres would be studied. Individuals with interest and expertise in various mechanisms of planetary heat transfer (convective, radiative) and thermodynamics of multi-phase flows (clouds) would make strong candidates for this project.

Global large-eddy simulation will be used to better understand how marine boundary layer clouds, and their form of organization, respond to warming globally. The successful applicant will work with a team to adapt the global storm resolving model ICON to an emerging class of exa-scale computers. Individuals with strong programming skills and interests in both simulation, clouds, and their role in climate change would make strong candidates for this project.

How humid could the tropics become? This project will study factors influencing the global distribution of humidity in the tropical mid troposphere, and its role in regulating Earth’s surface climate.   Depending on the candidate's interest these questions could be linked to observational studies of deep convection, or the the large scale dynamics of the tropics using realistically configured climate models. Individuals with an interest in tropical meteorology and deep moist convection, and their role in climate and climate change, as well as geophysical fluid dynamics would make strong candidates for this project.

Current research topic in OES (The Ocean in the Earth System, MPI-M)

For further information and questions concerning the position, please contact Peter Landschützer.

Recent research suggests an inconsistency between the uptake of CO2 at the sea surface and the rate of carbon storage in the ocean interior from observations. In part, this inconsistency can be attributed to coastal ocean areas and marginal seas currently being missing in air-sea flux reconstructions. The successful candidate will build on the 2-step SOM-FFN machine learning method that has been successfully applied to reconstruct the open ocean carbon sink from surface ocean observations and include the coastal ocean as well as marginal seas to reconstruct the global ocean to close current research gaps. The project aims to investigate the inter-annual through decadal variations and its drivers over the past 40 years as well as a quantification of its uncertainty and provide annual flux updates to the Global Carbon Budget. Furthermore, the successful candidate will investigate the differences in time and space between the CO2 fluxes at the sea surface and changes in the ocean interior carbon distribution